Browse Exhibits (17 total)

Ontario Dental Association: 150th anniversary

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In Toronto, on January 3-5, 1867, the first meeting of dentists occurred at the Queen's Hotel with the goal to establish the Ontario Dental Association (ODA). The efforts of the first members of the ODA resulted in the passing of the ‘Act Respecting Dentistry’ in 1868. This legislation permitted dentists to regulate their profession and create a dental school to ensure proper training of dental practitioners. After a few attempts, the first dental school in Ontario was opened in 1875. It is currently known as the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto. This space provides a brief biography of the nine dentists in attendance at the first meeting in 1867. In addition, you will find a summary of some popular dental topics in the late nineteenth century. 

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Pierson v. Post Judgment Roll

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Pierson v. Post has been made famous by its use in American property law classrooms since the 1950s. It is often the first case law students study in property as it provides an introduction to the concept of first possession and how one acquires possession in a wild animal, the fox, owned by no one. 

The case report reproduced in law school casebooks was created by New York’s first official law reporter George Caines after the case was argued by eminent counsel and reversed in Pierson’s favor at the New York Supreme Court. What law students generally read is a brief statement of the facts, followed the majority decision by Justice Daniel Tompkins and a dissent by Justice Brockholst Livingston. 

The Judgment Roll is a copy — probably made by the clerk of Pierson’s lawyer Nathan Sanford — of the documents Sanford filed in his writ of certiorari to the New York Supreme Court. This was a process in which the loser before a Justice of the Peace could appeal the decision by asking for the New York Supreme Court to command that the Justice of the Peace explain what had been done before him in the magistrate’s court, in this case a jury trial held at Post’s request on December 30, 1802, for their review. It was the job of the New York Supreme Court to check, yes, all the ‘i’s were dotted and ‘t’s were crossed in the magistrate’s proceedings and if they were not, Pierson (the “now plaintiff” before the New York Supreme Court) was justified in winning a reversal of the jury’s 75¢ award for Post and his $5 in costs. The Judgment Roll also includes the command to Justice of the Peace John N. Fordham to return the documentation, Sanford’s six specific grounds of appeal, as well as the words the New York Supreme Court used in order to hold the case over from year to year until it was ultimately decided in Pierson’s favor on September 10, 1805. Sanford then filed this copy of all of the documents (those provided by Fordham, his own, and the New York Supreme Court) as the “Record” in the case on the same day.

This judgment roll was found by University of Toronto law professor and legal historian Angela Fernandez at the Division of Old Records, New York County Clerk’s Office in New York City in May 2007.

Each page of the judgment roll is reproduced with an accompanying transcript prepared by Professor Fernandez.

It has subsequently disappeared but a dataset was created to preserve the images and make them publicly available. You can find it here. A transcript of the Judgment Roll is also available as an appendix in Angela Fernandez, Pierson v. Post, the Hunt for the Fox: Law and Professionalization in American Legal Culture (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Running Fox by Paul de Vos, courtesy of Museo Nacional del Prado.

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The State in the Bedroom - The Evolution of Reproductive Rights in Canada

To coincide with the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians and promote UTL special collections, Robarts Reference librarians Patricia Bellamy, Jesse Carliner, Nicholas Worby, and iSchool practicum student Tina Sabourin have curated an exhibit titled The State in the Bedroom: The Evolution of Reproductive Rights in Canada. This exhibit traces the legislative history of reproductive rights in Canada from 1892 to the end of the 20th century. The story of changing laws and mores relating to contraception, abortion, sexual and reproductive health education, and involuntary sterilization is told from a uniquely Canadian perspective using government reports, transcripts of parliamentary debates, hearings, bills and statutes, zines, posters and pamphlets, and documentary film, all from the University of Toronto Libraries’ collections. Although intended to showcase government information from the Government Publications collection in Robarts Library, other libraries generously loaned materials also featured in the exhibition, including

Robarts Library stacks
Women’s Education Resource Collection (WERC), OISE Library
Media Commons, Robarts Library, 3rd floor
Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
Bora Laskin Law Library
University of Toronto at Scarborough Library

For further information on the exhibit please consult the Reproductive Rights in Canada research guide* or visit Reference and Research Services on the 4th floor of Robarts Library.

http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/reproductiverights

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The University of Toronto: Snapshots of its History

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Introduction

This exhibition, “The University of Toronto: Snapshots of its history”, was mounted in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library in 2002 as a part of the University’s 175th anniversary celebrations. It complemented the launch in March, 2002, of Martin Friedland’s The University of Toronto: a history, the first such history to appear in seventy-five years. The exhibition provided a look at certain broad themes at the University over the course of its history, especially some involving students that were not discussed by Professor Friedland. These themes were represented in the eight display cases on the 2nd floor of Fisher, with overflow material displayed in the Maclean Hunter Room. The material used was drawn largely from the holdings of the University Archives, along with some items from the Fisher Library and Trinity College Archives.

Forward

This exhibition and its accompanying catalogue are part of the year-long celebrations of the one hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary of the University of Toronto. Professor Martin L. Friedland's acclaimed The University of Toronto: A History was launched in March and it seems most appropriate, as 2002 draws to a close, that an exhibition curated by Harold Averill, who was intimately involved in the history project, should round out the year. Harold has provided evocative "snapshots" of the whole history of the University of Toronto: its buildings, its faculty, staff and students, and the vital role it has played in the evolution of society in Toronto and the rest of the country. We catch glimpses of the political conflict, scientific progress, sports, and the arts and all the other aspects of varsity life that have contributed to our vibrant culture. We wish to acknowledge another instance of generosity of our old friend, Wentworth Walker, and the continued support of the Friends of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. Velut Arbor Aevo.

Richard Landon, Director

Preface

It is a great pleasure to write a preface to this volume by Harold Averill. Harold's store of knowledge about the history of the University of Toronto is unique, as the display and this text amply demonstrate. He knows the sources and, moreover, can find them. In writing the history of the University over a five year period, my research assistants and I learned first hand about Harold's expertise. In the prologue to The University of Toronto: A History I state: "I am particularly indebted to archivist Harold Averill, the great font of historical knowledge about the University, who helped me and my research assistants find material and photographs." Anyone who has worked in the U of T Archives would say the same. Now other persons who view the exhibit or read this volume can see for themselves why I called him the 'great font of historical knowledge about the University.' He has captured succinctly in his text 175 years of history and has found pictures, documents and artefacts - most of which have not been shown before - to illuminate that history.

Martin Friedland

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